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October 27, 2004

Comments

Zach

http://www.nytimesweddings.blogspot.com
DATE: 11/01/2004 12:22:18 AM
Thanks for the link to my blog. I just gave your's a read, and I must say that I'm quite impressed. I have very strong feelings on the state of American gastronomy, and your blog seems to be in step with most of my ideals. I can't say we're completely like-minded, though, since I've dedicated one day a month for the past year to writing scolding letters to Ruth Reichl. I think Gourmet magazine is deletirious to the state of cuisine in America, and its spineless capitulation to all those "special advertising sections" shows that it cares little for actual technique and culinary study and more for mindless consumerism and trendy gadgetry. I haven't read the cookbook, though, so maybe it's alright.


My favorite cookbook series, if you care, is the Konemann "Culinaria" series. They've been discontinued, but you can still get the Italy edition on the cheap. They also have books on France, Germany, Hungary, the Caribbean, and the
U.S. Just search Amazon Books for Culinaria and you'll find them.

Sorry for the rant, but I get preachy about this stuff. Keep up the good work, and thanks again for the link.

Jess


EMAIL: jnritz@gmail.com
IP: 209.232.173.82
URL:
DATE: 11/01/2004 05:37:55 PM
Thanks for the comment. I love your site, it's such a great added bonus to Sundays. And something to look forward to when I'm trying to ward off what my family calls the "Sunday night disturbies!"


Not to mention the fact that you totally stuck it to someone with whom my friend used to work and despised. ;)

I'm with you re: the "Special Advertising Sections" prominently featured in Gourmet. Even more insidious is how the graphics are so close to that of the magazine that the line between the ads and content is increasingly blurred (as if that's not already a problem). I think this unsettling trend has less to do with Reichl's interest, however, than the Condescending & Nasty marketing machine and Mr. Newhouse's bottom line. The book is pretty good except for the hard-to-read yellow title issue that the Washington Post mentioned last week.


I'll dig around the Internet for the Culinaria goodies and scan the letters published in Gourmet in hopes of seeing your byline very soon!

Zach

borat_123@yahoo.com
IP: 66.65.178.254
URL: http://www.nytimesweddings.blogspot.com
DATE: 11/01/2004 11:06:59 PM
Yeah, I hate to blame Reichl for it, but she's the editor so I have no choice. I read a few of her books, and they weren't bad (I'm still more of a Steingarten guy). I quite enjoy using the language of her books against her to show how Gourmet is threatening everything she learned growing up.


To be honest, I blame Sara Moulton more than anybody. She seems to be the biggest champion of that "efficiency over quality" ethos that infuriates me. Moulton is also one of those people who thinks that mango relish is somehow the great savior of American food. I thought that the death of Julia Child would spark a renaissance of classical French technique in popular cooking media, but sadly nobody has recognized this absence yet. I'm not saying French cuisine is the be-all end-all of gastronomy (I am tempted to, though), but when you see how it is utterly ignored on the Food Network, Gourmet, Bon Appetit, and the other disposable cooking periodicals you must agree that Ms. Child would be appalled.

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